Why social workers must be at the forefront of the changing healthcare system – #MacroSW 2/15/18 at 9pm EST

I’m looking forward to this week’s #MacroSW chat on 2/15/2018.

#MacroSW

By Alyssa Lotmore

Social workers understand those most in need of, and at risk for, not getting adequate health care. However, we are rarely at the table in the policy and macro settings to help create policy/practice/research that contributes to well-being and health for communities.  As the mindful facilitators of interdisciplinary practice, we must open the conversation to practical steps to ensure that customers of health care, especially those most marginalized have access to and receive preventative and on-going healthcare.

This chat topic was inspired by the Navigator Program, which is hosted by the University at Albany’s (SUNY) School of Social Welfare. In this program, MSW students are hired to assist individuals in navigating the health care enrollment system. They gain the perspective of a varied customer base – those from all socio-economic backgrounds and especially those who social workers would be most likely to serve. The students practice skills, such…

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#MacroSW: Social Action 103 2/8/18

This week’s #MacroSW chat 2/8/2017: Social Action 103. I’ll be participating in this chat! See you there.

By Rachel L. West

The third part of our social action series will take place this Thursday, February 8th at 9:00 PM EST/6:00 PM PST. The series will be hosted by Rachel L. West (@poliSW). The series will examine what social action is, its role in social work, creating a personal and shared vision, social action planning, community assessment and mobilizing, and tactics.

This week’s chat will focus on action planning. If you missed the Social Action 101 and 102 you can read the transcripts here https://storify.com/OfficialMacroSW/social-action-101   https://storify.com/OfficialMacroSW/macrosw-2-1-18-social-action-102 .

Questions:

Q1: Have you ever put together an action plan? If so were you also responsible for implementing it?

Q2: For those who have experienced either developing or implementing an action plan, what wisdom can you share?

Q3: How do you keep yourself and team members motivated?. Note: By “team” I’m mean volunteers (community members and allies) as well as…

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Social Action 102: #MacroSW 2/1 at 9pm EST

#MacroSW Chat for this Thursday, 2/1 : Social Action 102

Women's_March_in_Ithaca,_New_York.jpg Photo Credit: By Random Tree (Own work) [CC0], via Wikimedia Commons The second part of our social action series will take place this Thursday, February 1st at 9:00 PM EST/6:00 PM PST. The series will be hosted by Rachel L. West (@poliSW). The social action series will examine what social action is, its role in social work, creating a personal and shared vision, social action planning, community assessment and mobilizing, and tactics.

This weeks chat will focus on Community Assessment. If you missed the Social Action 101 you can read the transcript here.

Questions:

Q1: How do you know a problem is actually a problem?

Q2: Have you ever carried out a community assessment? If so please share your experience of that process.

Q3: How do you gather information about the community?

Q4: What methods can be used to get feedback from community members?

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#UsToo?: Sexual Harassment in Social Work Education – #MacroSW Chat Jan. 25, 2018

#MacroSW chat for Thursday, January 25: sexual harassment in social work education.

Due to the most recent light that has been shed on sexual harassment and sexual assault with the #MeToo and #TimesUp hashtags, we will be looking sexual harassment that takes place in schools of social work.

As one of our guest experts for this chat, Dr. Melissa (Missy) Bird, says, “The era of  ‘handling it internally’ must end.”

A former social work Ph.D. student colleague of Missy’s at the University of Southern California filed a complaint against a professor who was found guilty of sexual harassment; he has faced no repercussions and will still be exposed to students. Since Missy blogged about it, many other instances of academic harassment were brought to her attention.

As Macro social workers we have an ethical obligation to publicly address harassment in all of its forms. Given the gender makeup of the profession (89% female), many forms of  harassment and unequal treatment takes place…

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The one change I will definitely make this year (2018 edition).

I know we are deep into January. Resolutions should have been made and broken by now! I try to avoid the resolution trap. We can make small changes at any time. Here’s one.

Technology is a part of my life. I’ve adapted my smartphone so that I can access
my work, read the news, listen to music, and track my exercise. By working on healthy digital literacy skills, I hope to continue harnessing this tool to enhance my life. The same goes for social media. I read a lot of blog posts about the scourge of Twitter or the life-suck of Facebook. I have concerns about the use of these media platforms, but digital literacy is required to make sure these products don’t overtake my life. Perhaps it’s optimistic, but platforms like these require harnessing. The responsibility of digital literacy rests with me, the user.

That said, I experienced a vacation from these technologies. Literally. I traveled out of the country and left the phone in the suitcase. This was instructive. I used my phone as a camera.

What did I enjoy not having? Notifications. I don’t need them. I turned them off. Just like 2006, I can at least decide when I access information via these platforms.

I did miss chatting with friends via Twitter. I think the ability to text friends has a lot of relevance in an adult’s life. I felt a little cut-off from work, where I do derive satisfaction and identity. I missed accessing music streaming.

So, that’s the little thing I’m changing: I will create a boundary between myself and my digital, automated life.

 

#MacroSW chat returns this Thursday, 1/18/18: The state of homicide in the U.S.

Welcome back to the first #MacroSW chat of 2018! This week’s chat will review the state of homicide in the US in 2017. Our chat will discuss current homicide research, challenges, and policy implications. Our guest expert will be Tanya L. Sharpe, PhD, MSW (@DrTSharpe), an Associate Professor at the University of Maryland, School of Social […]

via Homicide – A Year in Review – #MacroSW 1/18 at 9pm EST —

Where I really hear my student’s voices? The online discussion board.

I started using discussion boards out of complete practicality. I had to be away for a conference, and I needed a solution for my evening class. I’ve come to use the discussion board in almost all my classes now because I find the use of discussion boards very helpful in engaging students in a different way. When I read student posts, I often realize that I may have been underestimating their interest or willingness to go into depth on a topic or theme.

A colleague asked me for some design tips. Here’s what I typically use.

 Planning:

  1. If you know you will be absent for the week, it’s good to give as much lead time as you can so students know what’s going on. At the very least, let students know at the beginning of your class this could be coming if you need to have a backup plan for an inclement weather week.
  2. Decide how you will grade or record the results of participation. In my case, I usually just count it towards attendance, but you can make planned online discussions part of a graded assignment.

Structure:

  1. For online discussions, I will usually create 4 questions, and let the students select 2 to answer.
  2. Students are directed to provide an answer that is 75 to 100 words.
    1. I set a deadline for this. If the class meets Monday, I will set a deadline that the first question/s be answered with a post by Wednesday evening at 11:59 p.m.
  3. Students are directed to provide two answers, one answer to two students.
    1. These answers should be 50 to 100 words and should be more than a “ditto” answer. They should provide positive support, challenging follow-up, or something that resembles a “yes, and…”.
  4. The answers should also have a deadline. If questions are answered by Wednesday, follow-ups should be completed by Sunday evening.

This is just a quick review of how I set discussion boards up.