Transcending Transphobia: Delivering Affirmative Care ~ #MacroSW Chat April 19, 2018

The trans flag - blue and pink horizontal stripes - with the caduseus (sign for meidcine - two snakes wrapped around a stick - in the middle and words: DO NO HARM _No Rx for discrimination Image: National Center for Transgender Equality

This week, Fae Johnstone @FaeJohnstone (White, Trans, She, They), a trans organizer and consultant from Ottawa, will help us gain a deeper understanding of the complexities of trans identities. Their talk , titled Stepping Up on Queer and Trans Youth Mental Health, is one of two essential resources for this week’s chat.

Please watch the 24-minute video, Stepping Up. In it, Fae explains basic vocabulary (nonbinary, cissexism, gender identity, assigned gender, etc.), plus the extraordinary and depressing statistics on lgbtq youth mental health. They share their own story of walking out the door every day as a queer trans youth.

The second essential resource for this week’s chat is Affirmative Care for Transgender and Gender Non-Conforming People, with practical tips and training resources.

This chat will give you resources on how to support trans clients, and ideas about how we can collectively address the…

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Blog Post! Day 2 #SWDE2018 Conference Notes (4/12/18).

I know this is the same feeling I get every year, but didn’t I just get here? It’s Friday when I write this summary of Thursday (day 2). I’ll write this as best I can without expressing the small sense of sadness of saying goodbye to friends and colleagues, while also the feeling of anticipation of returning home.

Day 2 is the busiest day of this conference, where a full slate of presentations from 9:00 until 5:00 are scheduled. I mentioned last year the tendency to feel as if I’m missing out if I choose a section or presentation, only to find that another presentation across the hall was a life-changing event or something. So it goes. This year was no different, however, the conference organizers stepped up the social media application. We used Guidebook this year, an application new to me. This allowed for conference participants to check in within the application, find other participants and send messages, schedule attendance, and share photos. In some ways, Guidebook creates something of a walled-in space to share information and thoughts about the conference, something also handled by using the conference hashtag on existing platforms like Twiter. I found the scheduling feature to be more simple and intuitive than other conference applications, though the scale of the conference may have something to do with that. (CSWE’s Annual Program is a whole different thing, and I’m sure I’ve missed really good opportunities every year just due to the massive scale of that Con.)

What I saw today

For #SWDE2018 I sought out sessions that addressed the transfer or courses from IRL to either a hybrid or online course. This is always easier said than done, and a lot of assumptions about how this process is handled remain. As I noted in my last conference summary post, Prof. Matthea Marquart of Columbia University presented on the subject of connecting online and IRL students in the same space and time. Today, Professor Christopher Ward of Winthrop University discussed this transition from face-to-face to online and provided a matrix containing a lot of concise detail on applications and platforms to aid in this transition.

In the next session,  Professors Jae McQueen and Ann Obermann of the University of Denver discussed the critical pedagogy, and how this applies to your course design and evaluation. As an opening exercise, the members of the audience were asked to consider five terms that we think describe ourselves. Then we were asked to consider if these descriptors come to our students’ minds. The ensuing discussion probed these ideas. This was part of a larger discussion about how we present ourselves as instructors to our students.

At the last session, I attended, Dr. Todd Sage, assistant professor at the University of Buffalo and Dr. Nathalie Jones, assistant professor at Tarleton State, presented on using tech platforms outside the standard learning management system. Flipgrid was featured as an example of an easily applicable tool. I confess I’ve wanted to implement for a while now but haven’t done it yet.

What I Did Today

I was very fortunate to present with my colleague, Associate Professor Julia Kleinshmit. We discussed a policy-focused signature assignment for our school’s Organization and Community Practice class. This assignment is designed to have students engage as a professional advocate for community policy change using social media.  In my view, this helps elevate the use of social media beyond “slactivism“. Use of social media is sometimes equated with ineffective signaling rather than the pursuit of change; this assignment is meant to elevate the use of major platforms (Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin, YouTube).

Today I also created and presented my first poster presentation. I covered the basics of the #MacrosW Collaboration, with which I am a partner. I was very excited to talk about this collaboration. I look forward to more presentations like this. Speaking directly to people who have interest in the topic presented on the poster felt rewarding. I used Google Slides to present on this topic.

Dr. Laurel Iverson Hitchcock created a blog post on how to incorporate #MacroSW chat in the classroom.

It was a fantastic day, which ended with a few colleagues gathering at a restaurant just south of the Riverwalk. I threw my family off balance when I said I was having oysters for dinner in Texas. Always challenge the bias.

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#MacroSW 4.5.18 Cyber Social Work

business_meeting_online_800_clr_16432This week’s chat is on the topic of Cyber Social Work. This topic will explore the concept of technological competence in social work practice, preparation of social work students for today’s digital world, digital mental health issues and the role of cyber liability insurance.

Here is a link the Canadian Cyber Social Worker (2012 YouTube video): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HTyvT5e1cNQ

JanetJoinerOur host will be Janet M. Joiner, Ph.D., chair and assistant professor in the Department of Social Work at the University of Detroit Mercy. She holds a doctorate from Wayne State University in Educational Leadership & Policy Studies and BSW & MSW degrees from Western Michigan University. She is founder of the Institute for Cyber Social Work, an organization dedicated to advancing digital social work practice and education. She tweets under the name @CyberSocialWork ‏.

Here are the questions we hope to discuss during the chat:

  1. What does it mean to…

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#MacroSW Chat 3/22/2018: Gun Violence, Mental Health, and the Social Worker’s Role

Columbine. Sandy Hook. Pulse Night Club. Las Vegas and now Parkland.…the list is longer than the mention of these horrendous mass shootings. Social workers will continue to play a key role in helping our country enforce current gun regulations and grabble with enacting new laws for the public’s safety while balancing people’s right to bear arms. But in the wake of the Parkland shooting how we move forward to stop gun violence continues to be a vexing problem.

Join us on Thursday, March 22 at 9 p.m. Eastern (6 p.m. Pacific) for the #MacroSW chat to explore gun policies and perspectives and how social workers can continue to make an impact to end gun violence and discuss ways people can engage in this debate to make real change.

On a personal note, I’m heartbroken about the Parkland school shooting which took place in my hometown of Fort Lauderdale in Broward…

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#MacroSW chat for 3/15/2018: The emerging social work role in public libraries.

I’m hosting this week’s #MacroSW chat on 3/15/2018.

During Social Work Month, let’s celebrate a special facet of our practice: social workers are team members. We are found in hospital units, community planning organizations, and in many other formal or informal groups. While not as pronounced, social workers have become more active in the environment of the public library.  Examples of this growth in social work presence include Denver, Colorado, where a library social worker addresses needs of people who are homeless; an Anchorage, Alaska library social worker addressing homeless needs there; a social worker addressing mental health needs of community members at the St. Paul Public Libraries; and social workers aligned with the Richland, South Carolina library system, where patrons can schedule appointments via a web portal.

What factors are behind this increased social work presence? It’s worth observing that librarians, educators, and other civil servants have led the change to adapt library environments to community…

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Inequality for All w/ @JimmySW on 3/8/18 #MacroSW

Reblog from MacroSW: This week’s #MacroSW chat is 3/8/2018

IFA_Image1Social work students (and everyone else) from across the country are welcome to participate in a student-focused chat about income equality.  Join us for a live, interactive event in which social work professor Jimmy Young, of the California State University San Marcos, along with #MacroSW Partner, Laurel Hitchcock, of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, will facilitate a live discussion about the documentary film Inequality for All on Thursday, March 8th at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST).

Don’t miss this unique opportunity to connect with social work students, educators and practitioners from around the world. To participate:

  1. Watch the documentary Inequality for All. See below for information on how to access the movie.
  2. Your instructor may ask you to write a brief statement about your reaction to the movie.
  3. Participate in the live Twitter chat using the hashtag #MacroSW. Tweet any questions or responses directed to the moderators and social…

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