U.S. Immigration policy, 2018: What must social workers do? #MacroSW Chat 6/21/2018 at 9:00 p.m. eastern

MacroSW Chat graphic 6 21 2018.png

Topic synopsis:

For this week’s #MacroSW chat, we’ll be discussing what we are witnessing unfolding at the U.S./Mexico border. Social workers are witnessing a new policy of immigration engagement: the active separation of children from their families. This is a new interpretation of immigration policy, and the intent of this new action is not uniformly clear. New media outlets have only sparing instances of viewing or interviewing people at the centers of detention, and government representatives have not been in agreement as to why the policy of separation is in place.  In one example of this confusion, Secretary of Homeland Security Kristjen Nielson communicated via Twitter that family separation wasn’t happening, but then communicated later that the practice was occurring. In 2017, Chief of Staff John Kelly described the plan to separate children from families as an attempt to deter illegal immigration (Stahl, 2018).

Social workers are reportedly engaged at the border detention centers, however, reports suggest that social work presence is minimal (Soboroff & Ainsley, 2018).  Not much is known yet about the role of social workers in this environment. However, the possibility of social workers intervening in harmful policy is concerning. The forced separation of children from their parents is traumatic and can cause lasting psychological injury to the child, according to Dr. Colleen Kraft, president of the American Academy of Pediatrics (Scott, 2018).

Among the possible discussion questions for 6/21/18 chat include: 

  1. What do we currently know about the immigration policy at the US/Mexico border?
  2.  How are social workers engaged at the border?
  3. How does this practice of separating children from their families conflict with the Code of Ethics?
  4. What should we, as members of the social work profession, be doing to address this policy?
  5. What other thoughts do you have?

 

About #MacroSW:

#MacroSW is a collaboration of social workers, organizations, social work schools, and individuals working to promote macro social work practice. Macro social work practice focuses on changing larger systems, such as communities and organizations. It encompasses a broad spectrum of actions and ideas, ranging from community organizing and education to legislative advocacy and policy analysis. The chats are held weekly on Twitter every Thursday at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST). Click here for a list of chat partners. For information about how to participate in the #MacroSW chat, view our FAQs. For chat schedule and chat archives check out: http://macrosw.com.

 

 

Resources:

Scott, D. (2018, June 18). The family separation crisis is a health crisis. Vox.

https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2018/6/18/17475810/immigration-family-separation-health-crisis

Soboroff, J & Ainsley, J. (2018, June 18). McAllen, Texas, immigration processing center is largest in U.S. NBC News.

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/mcallen-texas-immigration-processing-center-largest-u-s-n884126

Stahl, J. (2018, June 18.). The most audacious moment from Kirstjen Nielsen’s child separation presss conference. Slate.

https://slate.com/news-and-politics/2018/06/kirstjen-nielsens-child-separation-press-conference-was-full-of-audacious-claims.html

 

 

 

New publication in the NonProft Quarterly: Why we have to social work this

Here’s a new publication! Thanks to my colleagues in the #MacroSW Collaboration, 

Source: #MacroSW Collaboration (2018, May 4). Why we have to social work this. NonProfit Quarterly. Retrieved: https://nonprofitquarterly.org/2018/05/03/voices-field-social-work/

 

 

 

 

#MarchForOurLives & Social Action with Youth – #MacroSW 5/3 at 9pm EST

image4.jpgJoin us this Thursday as we explore how to work with youth for social action. Our guest expert will be Kim Hokanson, one of the organizers for the #MarchForOurLives event in Boston.

image3Here are questions we will discuss:

  1. What were your goals for the #MarchForOurLives event?
  2. How did you involve youth in this work?
  3. What role did terminology play in planning and organizing the event?
  4. What lessons did you learn from co-planning this event?
  5. What recommendations do you have for others who want to do social activism work with youth?

Resources:

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#MacroSW 4/12/18 – Home Care Workers in Home and Community Based Services

I’ll be at a conference during this chat, but I hope to attend at least part of the #MacroSW chat on 4/12/18 on Home Care Workers.

P1-BN177_LABORR_P_20130917181139For this week’s chat, we will be talking about the issues facing home care workers who care for older and disabled adults in their homes and communities.

According to the Paraprofessional Health Care Institute (PHI), there are over 2 million home care workers in the US who provide care to older adults and persons with disabilities in community based residential settings.  The demand for home care workers has grown exponentially over the past 10 years and is anticipated to continue to grow, as the population of people over age 65 continues to grow.  Most of these aging adults report a desire to want to age in place at home.

Home care workers in most of the United States are often women (88%), people of color (28% African-American and 21% Hispanic or Latinx), and immigrants (28% born in other countries) (PHI, 2017).  Wages for a home care workers range from $8.46/hr…

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Why social workers must be at the forefront of the changing healthcare system – #MacroSW 2/15/18 at 9pm EST

I’m looking forward to this week’s #MacroSW chat on 2/15/2018.

#MacroSW

By Alyssa Lotmore

Social workers understand those most in need of, and at risk for, not getting adequate health care. However, we are rarely at the table in the policy and macro settings to help create policy/practice/research that contributes to well-being and health for communities.  As the mindful facilitators of interdisciplinary practice, we must open the conversation to practical steps to ensure that customers of health care, especially those most marginalized have access to and receive preventative and on-going healthcare.

This chat topic was inspired by the Navigator Program, which is hosted by the University at Albany’s (SUNY) School of Social Welfare. In this program, MSW students are hired to assist individuals in navigating the health care enrollment system. They gain the perspective of a varied customer base – those from all socio-economic backgrounds and especially those who social workers would be most likely to serve. The students practice skills, such…

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