#MarchForOurLives & Social Action with Youth – #MacroSW 5/3 at 9pm EST

image4.jpgJoin us this Thursday as we explore how to work with youth for social action. Our guest expert will be Kim Hokanson, one of the organizers for the #MarchForOurLives event in Boston.

image3Here are questions we will discuss:

  1. What were your goals for the #MarchForOurLives event?
  2. How did you involve youth in this work?
  3. What role did terminology play in planning and organizing the event?
  4. What lessons did you learn from co-planning this event?
  5. What recommendations do you have for others who want to do social activism work with youth?

Resources:

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#MacroSW chat for 4/26/2018 at 9 p.m. E/8 p.m. Central – End of Semester Happy Hour (open chat)!

(Note: our originally scheduled chat for this week needed to be rescheduled. We will post updates soon.)

 

 

 

As the spring semester comes to a close, social work students are wrapping up their spring assignments, looking to engage in summer activities (maybe more classes, field work, or maybe even… a break? Do we even have that?)

For social work practitioners, the approach of summer can also mean a shift in how they engage in their respective areas of practice. In my own work experience, hospital social work, summer was often referred to as “trauma season”. Summer wasn’t necessarily a break, but a shift in how I focused my skills.

For this week’s chat, let’s take a breath, reflect on where we’ve been, and what path we are taking as we head into the next phase of the year…and our lives.

While this chat will be somewhat student-centric, all…

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Transcending Transphobia: Delivering Affirmative Care ~ #MacroSW Chat April 19, 2018

The trans flag - blue and pink horizontal stripes - with the caduseus (sign for meidcine - two snakes wrapped around a stick - in the middle and words: DO NO HARM _No Rx for discrimination Image: National Center for Transgender Equality

This week, Fae Johnstone @FaeJohnstone (White, Trans, She, They), a trans organizer and consultant from Ottawa, will help us gain a deeper understanding of the complexities of trans identities. Their talk , titled Stepping Up on Queer and Trans Youth Mental Health, is one of two essential resources for this week’s chat.

Please watch the 24-minute video, Stepping Up. In it, Fae explains basic vocabulary (nonbinary, cissexism, gender identity, assigned gender, etc.), plus the extraordinary and depressing statistics on lgbtq youth mental health. They share their own story of walking out the door every day as a queer trans youth.

The second essential resource for this week’s chat is Affirmative Care for Transgender and Gender Non-Conforming People, with practical tips and training resources.

This chat will give you resources on how to support trans clients, and ideas about how we can collectively address the…

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Blog post! #SWDE2018: Day 3 & an attempt at a Twitter summary (in lieu of Storify)

It’s over already?

For me, The last day of the conference means attempting to get in what I can before flying home. Participants start to exist abruptly, so these things tend to end with hurried goodbyes. Several of my colleagues had to take earlier flights out to catch rerouted flights to avoid a storm. Fortunately, as noted by Prof. Melanie Sage, “one of the best things about technology is its power to facilitate real-life relationships & bring us together in physical spaces as pals having already done relationship work” (https://twitter.com/melaniesage/status/984909789170929664). I concur with this. So much of my work with my colleagues at this and other conferences comes from the use of distance-aiding technologies. Getting the work done, developing interventions, and providing leadership social work education…everything relies so much on the critical understanding of the same technologies we use when we teach students. It’s not simply parallel process; it is the process.

For this final post on the conference, I sought to curate Twitter to share some themes. Spotify is no more, so I thought I’d try something here: choose some general categories and repost relevant tweets.

Now, what I would love to do is organize tweets by the schedule, so readers can find the relevant images and comments for each session. That’s just not practical…after sleeping in on Saturday, I realize my usual deadlines are approaching.

So for this post, I’m going to curate by subjects that in my experience make up the parts of a meaningful academic conference:

The research: presentations that covered some form of study, review, intervention or analysis.

The ideas: impresssions and analysis of the status of distance education and where it’s going. Some of these posts could easily fit under the category of research.

The design: presentations that addressed some form of classroom, curriulum or program design.

The applications and tools: presentations that cover specific applications and tools that can enhance the learning evnironment and outcomes.

The people: Selfies, presentations, gatherings, group photos…I attempted to add them here.

The locale: San Antonio has so much to offer. This was a category very much lacking in Twitter posts. Maybe people didn’t share their after-hours dining using the #SWDE2018 hashtag? I hope we can do more sharing of the community around us next year.

MAJOR DISCLAIMER: These are in no particular order, other than each category follows the timeline of the program by day, more or less. I looked for posts that provide enough context so readers can glean the meaning of each post on its own. Also, my categories here are admittedly open and vague. I may have posted a tweet that fits better under Research than Design.

Also, to get the most comprehensive picture via the Twitter platform, simply search #SWDE2018 in Twitter. All I’ve attempted to do here is to apply some form of categorization.

Also, final disclaimer, I’m sure I’m missing some really good stuff. If you happen to read this and want to add something, send me a DM at @spcummings

Research

https://twitter.com/MattheaMarquart/status/984505749438107649

Ideas (The Think Tank)

https://twitter.com/melaniesage/status/984155234502152193

Design

https://twitter.com/spcummings/status/984138817383911424

Applications and Tools

https://twitter.com/spcummings/status/984437844923084800

The People

https://twitter.com/DrHawleyB/status/984107663926661120

Blog Post! Day 2 #SWDE2018 Conference Notes (4/12/18).

I know this is the same feeling I get every year, but didn’t I just get here? It’s Friday when I write this summary of Thursday (day 2). I’ll write this as best I can without expressing the small sense of sadness of saying goodbye to friends and colleagues, while also the feeling of anticipation of returning home.

Day 2 is the busiest day of this conference, where a full slate of presentations from 9:00 until 5:00 are scheduled. I mentioned last year the tendency to feel as if I’m missing out if I choose a section or presentation, only to find that another presentation across the hall was a life-changing event or something. So it goes. This year was no different, however, the conference organizers stepped up the social media application. We used Guidebook this year, an application new to me. This allowed for conference participants to check in within the application, find other participants and send messages, schedule attendance, and share photos. In some ways, Guidebook creates something of a walled-in space to share information and thoughts about the conference, something also handled by using the conference hashtag on existing platforms like Twiter. I found the scheduling feature to be more simple and intuitive than other conference applications, though the scale of the conference may have something to do with that. (CSWE’s Annual Program is a whole different thing, and I’m sure I’ve missed really good opportunities every year just due to the massive scale of that Con.)

What I saw today

For #SWDE2018 I sought out sessions that addressed the transfer or courses from IRL to either a hybrid or online course. This is always easier said than done, and a lot of assumptions about how this process is handled remain. As I noted in my last conference summary post, Prof. Matthea Marquart of Columbia University presented on the subject of connecting online and IRL students in the same space and time. Today, Professor Christopher Ward of Winthrop University discussed this transition from face-to-face to online and provided a matrix containing a lot of concise detail on applications and platforms to aid in this transition.

In the next session,  Professors Jae McQueen and Ann Obermann of the University of Denver discussed the critical pedagogy, and how this applies to your course design and evaluation. As an opening exercise, the members of the audience were asked to consider five terms that we think describe ourselves. Then we were asked to consider if these descriptors come to our students’ minds. The ensuing discussion probed these ideas. This was part of a larger discussion about how we present ourselves as instructors to our students.

At the last session, I attended, Dr. Todd Sage, assistant professor at the University of Buffalo and Dr. Nathalie Jones, assistant professor at Tarleton State, presented on using tech platforms outside the standard learning management system. Flipgrid was featured as an example of an easily applicable tool. I confess I’ve wanted to implement for a while now but haven’t done it yet.

What I Did Today

I was very fortunate to present with my colleague, Associate Professor Julia Kleinshmit. We discussed a policy-focused signature assignment for our school’s Organization and Community Practice class. This assignment is designed to have students engage as a professional advocate for community policy change using social media.  In my view, this helps elevate the use of social media beyond “slactivism“. Use of social media is sometimes equated with ineffective signaling rather than the pursuit of change; this assignment is meant to elevate the use of major platforms (Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin, YouTube).

Today I also created and presented my first poster presentation. I covered the basics of the #MacrosW Collaboration, with which I am a partner. I was very excited to talk about this collaboration. I look forward to more presentations like this. Speaking directly to people who have interest in the topic presented on the poster felt rewarding. I used Google Slides to present on this topic.

Dr. Laurel Iverson Hitchcock created a blog post on how to incorporate #MacroSW chat in the classroom.

It was a fantastic day, which ended with a few colleagues gathering at a restaurant just south of the Riverwalk. I threw my family off balance when I said I was having oysters for dinner in Texas. Always challenge the bias.

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Blog post! #SWDE2018 Conference notes, Day 1.

We’re back in San Antonio for the 4th annual Social Work Distance Education conference. It’s been a beautiful day here, and for many of us, it’s been great to see friends and colleagues. I had the pleasure of doing just that, gathering for lunch along the river walk.

I wrote about #SWDE2017 conference last year, and I reflected on how the sessions moved from the general discussions of program design and useful applications to more focused sessions. Last year’s theme of social justice and most of the presentations were anchored accordingly. This year the theme is advancing social and economic justice through innovation, and the focus is clear: this first day, in particular, the final session oI attended, created a “think tank” environment of big-picture conversations. This may be where this conference may be headed: a stronger focus on futurism, where we are headed, and how social workers can (and should) be leaders.

As always with a conference like this, hard choices need to be made…I wish I could be everywhere. Here’s a sample of what I learned today:

Keynote: Kaye Shelton, Ph.D.

Dr. Shelton is an Associate Professor of Educational Leadership in the Center for Doctoral Studies in the College of Education and Human Development at Lamar University. She’s a prolific writer on the subject of online education. After this presentation, An Administrator’s Guide to Online Education. After this presentation, I decided I need to read this book in its entirety.  Dr. Shelton covered a range of techniques instructors can use to engage students meaningfully. (I found myself reflecting on the need to be more active and attentive to my online student discussion boards.) Dr. Shelton pointed us to a couple of resources she developed: OLC Quality Scorecard, where many free resources for improving online teaching and learning can be found; and Tip and Tricks for Teaching Online .

Session 1: Dr. Christie Mason of Loyola University spoke on principles and strategies for fostering community in online classes. She communicated the fundamental need to make sure our students feel safe to learn online. This can be assisted by strategically using informal discussion, developing meaningful approaches to introducing ourselves to the class. I learned a lot about using the tools on online education (#edtech) to encourage this community building in the online classroom environment.

Session 2: Matthea Marquart of Columbia University presented on methods and approaches to engaging in-real-life (IRL) students and online students in the same space. I am grateful Prof. Marquart presented on this topic, as I’ve seen how technology has helped move these historically partitioned student groups into the same general space.

Session 3: The end of the first day was a perfect time for a “big picture” presentation and Dr. Ellen Belluomini of Brandman University came through with a future-focused discussion on innovation through disruption. Dr. Belluomini didn’t shy away from giving examples of the perils of groupthink and made clear social workers must be leaders in research and practice, even if that means looking outside the traditional models of tenure-track promotional steps.

Reception:

This year we were on the rooftop. The weather was beautiful. I traveled from the Midwest to be here, and within a few minutes of the reception, I’d forgotten all about the snowstorm we’d endured there just a few days ago.

I’ll have more tomorrow. Unfortunately, Storify is no longer available to bring together the numerous social media posts out there…I’m looking for a solution and I’m open to suggestions.

 

#MacroSW 4/12/18 – Home Care Workers in Home and Community Based Services

I’ll be at a conference during this chat, but I hope to attend at least part of the #MacroSW chat on 4/12/18 on Home Care Workers.

P1-BN177_LABORR_P_20130917181139For this week’s chat, we will be talking about the issues facing home care workers who care for older and disabled adults in their homes and communities.

According to the Paraprofessional Health Care Institute (PHI), there are over 2 million home care workers in the US who provide care to older adults and persons with disabilities in community based residential settings.  The demand for home care workers has grown exponentially over the past 10 years and is anticipated to continue to grow, as the population of people over age 65 continues to grow.  Most of these aging adults report a desire to want to age in place at home.

Home care workers in most of the United States are often women (88%), people of color (28% African-American and 21% Hispanic or Latinx), and immigrants (28% born in other countries) (PHI, 2017).  Wages for a home care workers range from $8.46/hr…

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